Wesleyan and Primitive Methodist periodicals, 1744-1960

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Wesleyan and Primitive Methodism, 1744-1960

Wesleyan and Primitive Methodism, 1744-1960

Methodism is arguably the most significant single Christian religious movement since the Protestant Reformation. Other denominations (such as the Nazarenes and the Salvation Army) owe their origins or their beliefs to Methodism
Peter S. ForsaitResearch Fellow at Oxford Brookes University

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See the Methodist church develop under John Wesley and into the 20th century

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Although Methodism has come to be associated most closely with the Protestant Christian denomination founded by John Wesley (1703-1791), the term was already current in the seventeenth century, encompassing a number of different non-conformist churches including Calvinistic Methodism, to whose doctrine of predestinarianism Wesley, with his faith in universal redemption, was deeply opposed. Primitive Methodism emerged as a movement in the early 19th century from within the Wesleyan connexion, with which it eventually re-merged as part of the Methodist Union between the two World Wars. This resource from the special collections of the Oxford Brookes University brings together the main periodicals of the Wesleyan movement, beginning with the minutes of its earliest conference in 1744 and The Arminian magazine in 1778, and continuing through to the twentieth century. The materials in this collection are reproduced from items at the Oxford Centre for Methodism and Church History (Oxford Brookes University), which holds the library of the Wesley Historical Society. Accompanied by an online guide to the collection by Dr Peter S Forsaith, Research Fellow at the Oxford Centre for Methodism and Church History, Oxford Brookes University.

Contents

Wesleyan and Primitive Methodist periodicals, 1744-1960...

Containing 224,737 pages belonging to 302 documents housed in 9 volumes...

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Volumes

The Arminian magazine

Vol.1-20 (1778-1797). This monthly magazine was named by its founder, John Wesley, after the Dutch theologian Jacobus Arminius, or Jakob...

The Methodist magazine

Described in the first volume following the title change as "being a continuation of The Arminian magazine first published...

The Wesleyan-Methodist magazine

The title continues 'for the year 1822, [etc.]', with the subtitle "being a continutation of the Arminian or

Contents pages & indices to the Wesleyan periodicals

Reproduced here are the indexes as excerpts from the original annual volumes, giving a convenient overview of the breadth of...

Insights

  • The Arminian, Methodist, and Wesleyan-Methodist magazines are all installments of the same publication. The earliest volumes include sermons and letters by John Wesley, amongst others, as well as essays.
  • 'Minutes of Methodist Conferences' were printed publications. Comparing these minutes reveals how greatly the tone of conferences changed over time, from free discussions to a formal event.
  • The 'Conversations' mainly consist of ministers' obituaries and the motions for conferences. Lists of those studying to become preachers and those entering the ministry also feature.
  • Meanwhile, the Primitive Methodist magazine and the Aldersgate Magazine focused more upon current events and missionary work with the First Nations of the American States.
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